Applications Of Information Theory




Data compression


Shannon’s concept of entropy can be used to determine the maximum theoretical compression for a given message alphabet. In particular, if the entropy is less than the average length of an encoding, compression is possible.

Shannon’s theory shows that there exists an encoding that is roughly twice as efficient as the normal one for this simplified message alphabet. These results, however, apply only to large samples and assume that the source of the character stream transmits characters in a random fashion based on the probabilities in the table. Real text does not perfectly fit this model; parts of it tend to be highly nonrandom and repetitive. Thus, the theoretical results do not immediately translate into practice.

In 1977–78 the Israelis Jacob Ziv and Abraham Lempel published two papers that showed how compression can be done dynamically. The basic idea is to store blocks of text in a dictionary and, when a block of text reappears, to record which block was repeated rather than recording the text itself. Although there are technical issues related to the size of the dictionary and the updating of its entries, this dynamic approach to compression has proved very useful, in part because the compression algorithm adapts to optimize the encoding based upon the particular text. Many computer programs use compression techniques based on these ideas.

Error-correcting and error-detecting codes


Shannon’s work in the area of discrete, noisy communication pointed out the possibility of constructing error-correcting codes. Error-correcting codes add extra bits to help correct errors and thus operate in the opposite direction from compression. Error-detecting codes, on the other hand, indicate that an error has occurred but do not automatically correct the error. Frequently the error is corrected by an automatic request to retransmit the message. Because error-correcting codes typically demand more extra bits than error-detecting codes, in some cases it is more efficient to use an error-detecting code simply to indicate what has to be retransmitted.
Deciding between error-correcting and error-detecting codes requires a good understanding of the nature of the errors that are likely to occur under the circumstances in which the message is being sent. Transmissions to and from space vehicles generally use error-correcting codes because of the difficulties in getting retransmission. Because of the long distances and low power available in transmitting from space vehicles, it is easy to see that the utmost skill and art must be employed to build communication systems that operate at the limits imposed by Shannon’s results.
A common type of error-detecting code is the parity code, which adds one bit to a block of bits so that the ones in the block always add up to either an odd or even number. For example, an odd parity code might replace the two-bit code words 00, 01, 10, and 11 with the three-bit words 001, 010, 100, and 111. Any single transformation of a 0 to a 1 or a 1 to a 0 would change the parity of the block and make the error detectable. In practice, adding a parity bit to a two-bit code is not very efficient, but for longer codes adding a parity bit is reasonable. For instance, computer and fax modems often communicate by sending eight-bit blocks, with one of the bits reserved as a parity bit. Because parity codes are simple to implement, they are also often used to check the integrity of computer equipment.

 

Cryptology


Cryptology is the science of secure communication. It concerns both cryptanalysis, the study of how encrypted information is revealed (or decrypted) when the secret “key” is unknown, and cryptography, the study of how information is concealed and encrypted in the first place.

Shannon’s analysis of communication codes led him to apply the mathematical tools of information theory to cryptography in “Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems” (1949). In particular, he began his analysis by noting that simple transposition ciphers—such as those obtained by permuting the letters in the alphabet—do not affect the entropy because they merely relabel the characters in his formula without changing their associated probabilities.
Cryptographic systems employ special information called a key to help encrypt and decrypt messages. Sometimes different keys are used for the encoding and decoding, while in other instances the same key is used for both processes. Shannon made the following general observation: “the amount of uncertainty we can introduce into the solution cannot be greater than the key uncertainty.” This means, among other things, that random keys should be selected to make the encryption more secure. While Shannon’s work did not lead to new practical encryption schemes, he did supply a framework for understanding the essential features of any such system.

Physics

The term entropy was originally introduced by the German physicist Rudolf Clausius in his work on thermodynamics in the 19th century. Clausius invented the word so that it would be as close as possible to the word energy. In certain formulations of statistical mechanics a formula for entropy is derived that looks confusingly similar to the formula for entropy derived by Shannon.
There are various intersections between information theory and thermodynamics. One of Shannon’s key contributions was his analysis of how to handle noise in communication systems. Noise is an inescapable feature of the universe. Much of the noise that occurs in communication systems is a random noise, often called thermal noise, generated by heat in electrical circuits. While thermal noise can be reduced, it can never be completely eliminated. Another source of noise is the homogeneous cosmic background radiation, believed to be a remnant from the creation of the universe. Shannon’s work permits minimal energy costs to be calculated for sending a bit of information through such noise.
Another problem addressed by information theory was dreamed up by the Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell in 1871. Maxwell created a “thought experiment” that apparently violates the second law of thermodynamics. This law basically states that all isolated systems, in the absence of an input of energy, relentlessly decay, or tend toward disorder. Maxwell began by postulating two gas-filled vessels at equal temperatures, connected by a valve.Maxwell then described a mythical creature, now known as Maxwell’s demon, that is able rapidly to open and close the valve so as to allow only fast-moving molecules to pass in one direction and only slow-moving molecules to pass in the other direction. 
Information theory allows one exorcism of Maxwell’s demon to be performed. In particular, it shows that the demon needs information in order to select molecules for the two different vessels but that the transmission of information requires energy. Once the energy requirement for collecting information is included in the calculations, it can be seen that there is no violation of the second law of thermodynamics.

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